Tragedy of 21st century: LGBTIQ Refugee False claim problem and its reasons

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The elements for an asylum claim based on LGBT/H are a well-founded fear of persecution based on past persecution or risk of persecution in the future if returned to the country of origin because of his membership in a particular social group. The persecutor must be the government or a group or individual(s) that the government is unwilling or unable to control.

The applicant bears the burden of proof of establishing that she falls under this definition of refugee. The applicant is required to testify under oath regarding the truth of her application in order to meet this burden of proof. The Board of Immigration Appeals “not only encourage[s], but require[s] the introduction of corroborative testimonial and documentary evidence, where available.” 
Testimony, however, can be sufficient to sustain the applicant’s burden of proof if the testimony is credible.

The fact that there has been a development in tightening of boarders for the LGBTIQ refugees and asylum seekers in the safe havens, this has been partly because of the reason of the influx of many asylum claims on grounds of harassment based on gender, and sexual preferences.

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 “In Iran I had to hide my real self and in the UK, I have to prove to the others that I’m lesbian but how can I prove it?”
Says Kiana Firouz, an Iranian LGBT asylum seeker in the UK

Of course, it’s hard for officials to verify someone’s homosexuality, and some have expressed concern that fake claims are likely to be made. But in my opinion the risks to genuine asylum seekers outweighs the potential for abuse.

Your asylum application will be decided based on your unique facts, evidence, and witness statements. Moreover, asylum officers and Immigration Judges have a certain amount of discretion, and your chances might vary depending on who gets assigned to your case.

However, there are things you can do to increase the likelihood that you will obtain asylum. In addition to providing detailed and truthful information about why you are entitled to asylum, you must show that no “bars” (factors preventing your eligibility for asylum) apply to you. You should focus on preparing your application as best as you can to maximize your chances of obtaining asylum.

Also realize that your credibility is critical to obtaining asylum. You must be consistent throughout your application, and during your asylum interview and any Immigration Court hearings, even regarding details that are not directly related to your asylum claim. To increase the chances that you will be found credible, make sure that all of your statements are: true, detailed, complete (to the best of your memory), and consistent (with your other statements, with any other evidence you submitted, and with reports about your country).

Taking an example from Mr. Zand refering to LGBTIQ asylum cases as “The Golden Case” thus:

The number of [asylum request] cases [involving fake claims of] homosexuality [is so much that makes] it the 2nd most popular form of fake asylum cases after the cases of [fraudulent] apostasy [claims]…

[Translators’s note: Both apostasy and homosexuality in Iran have a documented history of death punishments.] 

The only reason fake homosexual [asylum] cases are not ranked number one yet is because homosexuality is not acceptable in the [Iranian] society and, in particular, in male groups — a surely undeserving status, but due to reasons, which are not fully clear to the author, this type of fake cases is becoming more and more popular among the ladies, and it can be predicted [with a fair amount of certainty] that in the near future a new wave of lesbian refugees will head to the UN offices, and, consequently, elevate this [type of fraudulent] case to its deserved standing [of number one] among the various fake cases [and asylum claims].

Concluding with the words of Judge Dana Marks.
“The mistake of granting a fraudulent asylum case is far less disastrous than denying a genuine one”

UGOM

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Tragedy of 21st century: LGBTIQ Refugee False claim problem and its reasons

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The elements for an asylum claim based on LGBT/H are a well-founded fear of persecution based on past persecution or risk of persecution in the future if returned to the country of origin because of his membership in a particular social group. The persecutor must be the government or a group or individual(s) that the government is unwilling or unable to control.

The applicant bears the burden of proof of establishing that she falls under this definition of refugee. The applicant is required to testify under oath regarding the truth of her application in order to meet this burden of proof. The Board of Immigration Appeals “not only encourage[s], but require[s] the introduction of corroborative testimonial and documentary evidence, where available.” 
Testimony, however, can be sufficient to sustain the applicant’s burden of proof if the testimony is credible.

The fact that there has been a development in tightening of boarders for the LGBTIQ refugees and asylum seekers in the safe havens, this has been partly because of the reason of the influx of many asylum claims on grounds of harassment based on gender, and sexual preferences.

image

 “In Iran I had to hide my real self and in the UK, I have to prove to the others that I’m lesbian but how can I prove it?”
Says Kiana Firouz, an Iranian LGBT asylum seeker in the UK

Of course, it’s hard for officials to verify someone’s homosexuality, and some have expressed concern that fake claims are likely to be made. But in my opinion the risks to genuine asylum seekers outweighs the potential for abuse.

Your asylum application will be decided based on your unique facts, evidence, and witness statements. Moreover, asylum officers and Immigration Judges have a certain amount of discretion, and your chances might vary depending on who gets assigned to your case.

However, there are things you can do to increase the likelihood that you will obtain asylum. In addition to providing detailed and truthful information about why you are entitled to asylum, you must show that no “bars” (factors preventing your eligibility for asylum) apply to you. You should focus on preparing your application as best as you can to maximize your chances of obtaining asylum.

Also realize that your credibility is critical to obtaining asylum. You must be consistent throughout your application, and during your asylum interview and any Immigration Court hearings, even regarding details that are not directly related to your asylum claim. To increase the chances that you will be found credible, make sure that all of your statements are: true, detailed, complete (to the best of your memory), and consistent (with your other statements, with any other evidence you submitted, and with reports about your country).

Taking an example from Mr. Zand refering to LGBTIQ asylum cases as “The Golden Case” thus:

The number of [asylum request] cases [involving fake claims of] homosexuality [is so much that makes] it the 2nd most popular form of fake asylum cases after the cases of [fraudulent] apostasy [claims]…

[Translators’s note: Both apostasy and homosexuality in Iran have a documented history of death punishments.] 

The only reason fake homosexual [asylum] cases are not ranked number one yet is because homosexuality is not acceptable in the [Iranian] society and, in particular, in male groups — a surely undeserving status, but due to reasons, which are not fully clear to the author, this type of fake cases is becoming more and more popular among the ladies, and it can be predicted [with a fair amount of certainty] that in the near future a new wave of lesbian refugees will head to the UN offices, and, consequently, elevate this [type of fraudulent] case to its deserved standing [of number one] among the various fake cases [and asylum claims].

Concluding with the words of Judge Dana Marks.
“The mistake of granting a fraudulent asylum case is far less disastrous than denying a genuine one”
UGOM

“Buy an item support underground LGBT in Uganda and refugees in Kenya Program Startup Fundraiser”

Underground LGBTIQ persons and refugees  Assistance Program Startup Fundraiser “Buy an Item and support support Ugandan underground LGBTIQ persons and refugees in Kenya”

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Organized by: Moses Walusimbi

Cotton T-shirt Sizes: (All sizes)

Ultra Cotton T-shirt
€ 30 (Unisex), Caps, etc

Help Us Raise Our “Buy an item and support the Underground LGBTIQ community and Help LGBTIQ refugees in danger ; in Uganda, Kenya and Africa at large,

Non-Profit organization dedicated to assisting with the day to day basic requirement funds for LGBT victims of anti-gay laws and homophobic violence, in Uganda , Kenya , and Africa at large.

Due to 35 of the world’s 75 countries that have anti-gay laws are in Africa, Africa is our top priority.

All funds raised will go to UGOM management, the organizer, for the cost surrounding starting up.

Thanks to our supporters!

Please do not hesitate to contact the organizer with any questions about this campaign .

More about this campaign

Uganda Gay On Move UGOM . Was founded in 2013. We are a Non-profit, organization. Please see our website for more information
http://www.ugandagayonmove.nl
we are also on Twitter @UgGayonmove or on Facebook at http://www.Facebook.com/ugandagayonmove.

Part of our mission is to help underground LGBTIQ persons and fled LGBTIQ refugees in kenya with their basic day to day needs partnering with underground LGBTIQ organisations that are doing much to change the situation . We aim to help persons who are ready to cooperate with  the underground organisations or individuals of our references specialising in the victims of anti-gay laws and homophobic violence as well as crisis management.

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In Africa being a homosexual can impose a life sentence in prison, or death by stone or call it mob Justice, or discrimination . Being in third world countries, and access to help for the LGBT community in Africa is non existent. These poor helpless victims of humanity are our primary focus.
Much as we look running to safe havens, we need to know that there are those LGBTIQ persons who will never have that chance and they are on grass root level in the community. They need our support the more.
So we should focus on making a safer atmosphere for those that are holding on. The safe havens may not be enough to take the entire LGBTIQ community if it decided to flee as a whole.

The underground LGBTIQ community in Uganda & a fled group of LGBTIQ persons in Kenya face horrible atrocities daily. Being a homosexual can impose up to a life sentence in prison, and fines. Besides the outlash against them.

The situation is crucial and the African LGBT community needs the basic daily needs and necessities as any human being should have. Refugees in kenya as many of them await for their evacuation in camps like kakuma, they face discrimination against them and as such they immediately go to survive in places they feel they are safer than in camps although it is not an easy task as they can not get employed since many fled without any thing to help them secure jobs. One buying an item from UGOM is a bigger contribution to the betterment of this most marginalised community.

Please help us help these people.

One of our programs vision is to ensure that the Underground LGBT persons in Uganda and refugees in kenya will be connected with other organizations, or individuals that in conjunction with our program will be able to make the transition from hate to love as smooth as possible.

We will as well ensure that the targeted group will be connected to individuals or organisations that will guide them on staying safe and not to fall victims of hate and violence against them.

Also we hope that those individuals or organisations on ground will be able to assist the target group with the asylum application process and services after asylum status is approved. 

For this fundraiser, being that our non-profit application is pending; will be temporarily sent to an account that will be provided to any one interested in any product on our list.
The funds will be used for the following:
 
1) :Ugandan underground LGBT and refugees in kenya support , funds are expected for provision of basic day  to day needs and requirements by this community at minimum 65% of proceeds
UGOM is in contact with prominent LGBTIQ persons, activists and underground organisations that are expected to distribute this support the targeted group.
We have trusted personels who will keenly follow how it is distributed.

2) Not more than 35% will be used solely for the start-up and operational costs. 

NO wages are paid from this campaign  

Thank you. 
Moses Walusimbi
Founder, President, and CEO 
Uganda Gay On Move (UGOM)

Share Why You Support

“Buy an item support underground LGBT in Uganda and refugees in Kenya Program Startup Fundraiser”

CLEAR CONNECTIONS (ACTIVISTS USING SOCIAL SOCIAL MEDIA PLATFORMS TO CHANGE THE MINDSETS BACK HOME AND KEEP TRACK ABOUT HOME)

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Moses Walusimbi fled Uganda’s anti-gay laws for The Netherlands and now runs Uganda Gay On Move UGOM – a blog, Facebook
and Twitter movement that helps gay Ugandans and Africans who have fled persecution as well as providing information for those
who are left behind and remain under threat.

“When I came to Holland, I realised the more you keep quiet the more you suffer,”

Walusimbi told Index. “I was very eager to know if there were any other Ugandans who are in Holland who are like me, in the same situation. And when I started these social media things, many Ugandans responded.”
His movement now has almost 8000 followers on Facebook, which he says is the most popular platform for his content. He also has followers on Twitter and his blog.

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Uganda Gay On Move is providing a support network that goes beyond publishing, with many photos of meetings between its
members for social and political reasons

“Uganda Gay On Move is like a family to us now. It’s like a family because we come together, we discuss, we find solutions,” said
Walusimbi.

These solutions have included the group petitioning and lobbying the Dutch parliament to raise awareness about the denial of the human rights of gay Ugandans and other Africans. It also publishes information that helps asylum-seekers manage their cases and gather evidence. But Walusimbi still worries about those in Uganda who could face
jail sentences simply for reading it.

“Ugandan LGBTI people  unless well known human rights defenders tend to use false names on Facebook. There is also
a danger when people attend internet cafes and do not securely log off.
There is also a danger and I have had several direct reports of family or friends seeing the Facebook pages left open on computers in
homes. Some people have been exposed this
way,”
Melanie Nathan, an LGBTI activist and publisher who has worked closely with African LGBTI movements, told Index.

“Using Facebook could result in meetings or revealing real names through trust and then in entrapment.”
Walusimbi corroborated that
there are real cases where this has happened.

Blogs by and for refugees from various conflict zones are building audiences.

The Medeshi Somaliland blog is one example. It was founded with a desire to keep in touch with a dispersed family and diaspora in
2007 by Mo Ali, who left Somaliland to seek asylum in the UK in 2004.
His work of aggregating and creating new content quickly became more political.

“There are many websites about Somaliland and those who are publishing there have been harassed by the police. They’ve
been ordered to shut down because of being critical of the government on freedom of speech and press,” Ali told Index, saying he knows of at least three websites that have been shut down and explaining why he has
to publish from abroad. Even publishing from the UK, he doesn’t feel totally safe,

“I’ve received death threats via email but published the threat online
and nothing happened. I’m still alive. It was just intimidation.”

Like Uganda Gay On Move, Ali has used the blog’s following to campaign, and in 2010 and 2012 rallied more than 1,000 of his followers to lobby outside London’s Parliament for official recognition of Somaliland.

Refugees are working on their own and with professional content and software creators to find bespoke ways to tell their stories. Dadaab Stories and the related Refugee News are two of the most elegant
Some refugees use blogs and social media channels to publish content banned at home to try to fight the repression they escaped
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Jason Daponte
http://www.indexoncensorship.org

UGOM

SURVEY ON LGBTIQ ASYLUM SEEKERS IN THE NETHERLANDS COA ASYLUM CAMPS

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UGOM members and other persons who are LGBTIQ asylum seekers in the Netherlands who have passed in the hands of COA or still under COA support in AZC camps (Asylum Seekers Camps) and are willing to participate in this survey are highly welcomed .

In this survey you can write about your views, they can be positive or negative or neutral depending on the way you see the services. Suggestions and ways forward are all vital in this survey about the services of COA inline with LGBTIQ treatment in camps.

Please know that any information provided will be handled confidentially and anonymously, so there will not be publishing of any names or something like that.

There has been placed the survey online on the website cocktailonline.nl:http://www.cocktailonline.nl/survey/There is also a paper version available, so if any one has been ever passed through the COA facilitation asylum seekers camps and he or she is LGBT  would like to participate and a paper version is easier, It  can also be used.

Jessica van Zadelhoff
Projectleider LHBT & asiel / Project manager LGBT & asylum

COC fights for LGBT rights
Federation of Dutch associations for the integration of homosexuality COC Netherlands

Your views matter a lot in shaping for you what really matters.
Be the change you want to see, get involved by participating in this survey.
“Human rights is our pride ”
UGOM

Train company Thalys thinks two women kissing is “intolerable”

Train company Thalys thinks two women kissing is “intolerable”

Will you support All Out member Mirjam and get Thalys to train its anti-gay staff?
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Dear Moses,

Imagine it. You spent the weekend with your partner in Paris. You say goodbye on the train platform with a hug and a kiss: it’ll be a while until you see each other again. Then an angry train official strides over to stop you kissing – he says it “can’t be tolerated”. Humiliating.

I’m Mirjam, an All Out member from Amsterdam. And this just happened to me, as I boarded a train from Paris. An official from train company Thalys told my girlfriend and I that it’s OK for straight couples to kiss on the platform, but not two women.

When I complained to Thalys, I expected a strong and quick response from them. I saw them as pro-equality: they even took part in Amsterdam’s Pride march. They say they’re looking into it, but that was weeks ago. Only a big outcry will show them that their reputation is at risk – and push them to take action.
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Will you ask Thalys to denounce this anti-gay customer service – and train their staff to treat everyone the same, whether lesbian, gay, bi or straight?
go.allout.org/en/a/mirjam-thalys

In 2013, Thalys got positive press for an ad campaign featuring a gay couple. The ads showed couples embracing – reunited thanks to Thalys trains, just like us! But in reality, they didn’t let me kiss my girlfriend on the platform. And they’re staying silent after one of their staff went on an anti-gay rant. We need to get them to put their marketing messages into action.

Will you call Thalys out on their hypocrisy?
go.allout.org/en/a/mirjam-thalys

I sent a complaint through the Thalys website when I arrived back in Amsterdam. I got a short reply that Thalys was looking into it. But that was weeks ago and I’ve had no indication that the company is taking it seriously.

This isn’t just about this one person’s anti-gay rant. It’s about pushing the company to turn their marketing messages into action, and ensure they treat everyone fairly. Pushing back on homophobia happens with small daily fights like this one. And I need you.

If enough of us stand up now, we could even have impact beyond this one company. Seeing customers protesting about Thayls’ mistake will make other big companies keen to train their staff too, to prevent similar embarrassment. So this campaign could benefit millions of customers across Europe.

Let’s build an outcry now: go.allout.org/en/a/mirjam-thalys

I’ve been an activist against sexism and homophobia for years, so I know what can be achieved if a whole movement stands together. Ever since I first signed an All Out petition against the anti-gay bill in Uganda, I’ve admired All Out’s guts and passion. I love that All Out connects like-minded people on fights for equality – big and small, around the world. Will you help me stand up to Thalys today? go.allout.org/en/a/mirjam-thalys

Let’s go All Out together,

Mirjam
All Out member from Amsterdam

P.S. My girlfriend and I can’t believe that a Thalys official picked on us, just because we’re not a straight couple.

He said that we couldn’t kiss on the platform – even though it’d be fine if we were straight! Will you help us get Thalys to train their anti-gay staff? go.allout.org/en/a/mirjam-thalys

 

Homosexuality in Prehistoric Africa

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Our knowledge of homosexuality in prehistoric African cultures is limited by the late-Middle Age European views of Africans, of homosexuality, and of course, the European reason for being in sub-Saharan Africa in the first place – the slave trade. Among the earliest references to it are some of the records of the Inquisition in Brazil. From theDenunciations of Bahia, (1591-1593) comes this thoroughly racist reference to it:

“Francisco Manicongo, a cobbler’s apprentice known among the slaves as a sodomite for ‘performing the duties of a female’ and for ‘refusing to wear the men’s clothes which the master gave him.’ Francisco’s accuser added that in Angola and the Congo in which he had wandered much and of which he had much experience, it is customary among the pagan negros to wear a loincloth with the ends in front which leaves an opening in the rear… this custom being adopted by the sodomitic negros who serve as passive women in the abominable sin. These passives are called jimbandaa in the language of Angola and the Congo, which means passive sodomite. The accuser claimed to have seen Francisco Manicongo “wearing a loincloth such as passive sodomites wear in his land of the Congo and immediately rebuked him.” (quoted by J. Treveisan, Perverts in Paradise, London, 1986. Elipses are his.)

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We can see from such references, that homosexuality was present in Africa from at least the earliest of European contact, and without much doubt, from long before. It wasn’t just central Africa, either. While European proprieties made such graphic description of African homosexualities uncommon in their descriptions of Africa, there are enough references to it to know that it was indeed present, and even used as a justification for considering African cultures primitive enough to justify slavery.

Among the last African cultures to be subjugated by Europeans, the Hausa peoples of northern Nigeria and the surrounding countries offer interesting examples of homosexuality among Islmaized peoples of Africa. Conquered by the British only in 1904, they were studied extensively by British ethnographers within a decade and a half of the arrival of the British – having experienced very limited contact with Europeans in the meantime. These ethnographers included sexual practices, including homosexuality, in their survey. Thus, they give us a unique glimpse into a nearly pristine African Islamic culture.

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The Hausa people have terms in their language that are used to describe homosexuals. Two terms are common,‘yan dauda, which is usually translated as “homosexual” or “transvestite” and‘dan dauda, which translates as a homosexual “wife.” The ‘yan dauda in Hausaland engange in stereotypical professions, much as marginalized gay men in the west often do. In Hausaland, they are often engaged in the sex trade – both as male prostitutes and as ‘procurers’ for female prostitutes. In the latter role, they do not behave as ‘pimps’ do in the west, maintaining ‘stables’ of female prostitutes under their subjugation, but rather simply as go-betweens, arranging, for a fee, liasons for men seeking the commercial charms of female prostitutes. In this role, they often engage as male prostitutes themselves when the opportunity arises.

Among other African tribes, homosexual behaviors among premarriage adolescents is common and is not even considered to be sex, since it does not involve procreative potential. In Camaroon, for example, homosexual acts as late as age 17 are considered innocent, not being “true” sexual relations. Such youth consider themselves virgins at marriage, even though they may have considerable homosexual experience in both roles. There are many stories among the Pangwe of Camaroon of men who hate women and prefer the company of men even when offered a large brideprice, of men who court other men, etc. That these behaviors existed within this tribe prior to European contact is evidenced by the richness and number of these stories.

In Zimbabwe, a nation racked by recent homophobic pogroms instituted by its viciously homophobic dictator, Robert Mugabe, there has historically been little known about homosexual behavior among peoples present prior to European contact. Some ethnographers have dishonestly attempted to show that homosexual behavior is a recent innovation encouraged by Europeans to serve their capital interests, in housing large numbers of male Africans together in barracks to serve as labor in the mines.

The reality is that homosexuality existed in Zimbabwe long prior to European contact, just like it did anywhere else in Africa. We know this because the San people had the indiscretion to record their group anal sexual intercourse on rock paintings that date back thousands of years.

The Bantu-speaking peoples of the plateau country were more circumspect, but have admitted to ethnographers that homosexual contact did occur, and was expected of pre-marriage adolescent males.

Court documents from the colonial era from Zimbabwe and South Africa (1920 and 1917 respectively) indicate that among both the Mazoe and Ndebele peoples of Zimbabwe and South Africa respectively, a fine of one beast was levied against persons attempting to engage in sodomy by traditional rulers in pre-colonial times from both tribes. This fine equates to a misdemeanor – evidence that it was not heavily frowned upon, nor particularly uncommon.

Colonial court records also show that prosecution for male homosexuality at the onset of colonial rule amounted to 1.5 percent of criminal cases in Zimbabwe, eventually declining to near zero, while prosecutions for heterosexual crimes, such as indecent assault, rape, etc., rose from almost nothing to significant portions of the criminal dockets. It must be noted that because the 1.5 percent represented unwilling participants in the criminal process, the actual extent of homosexual behavior was certainly much greater, since only those caught in flagrante delicto, those prosecuted with amicus, or those accused by jilted lovers or others with an axe to grind, represent the criminal numbers we see in the records. The actual numbers were certainly much higher. In more than 90 percent of cases, the defendant was an African male accused of assualting another African male or boy. Cases involving Europeans were much more rare.

The notion that this is “a white-man’s disease of recent origin” is made laughable by an even cursory examination of the criminal records of colonial Zimbabwe and South Africa. A close qualitative analysis of the early colonial trial transcripts shows that there was often shared property resulting from long-standing cohabitation by the defendant and his accusor. That the courts had to sort out the property details shows that these men had often considered themselves in a de facto marriage prior to their dispute.

Contrary to Mugabe’s and other Afrocentrists’ assertions, analysis of the colonial court cases show that the rates of prosecution for homosexual behaviors was highest among the more indigenous peoples (Shona, 17% and Ndebele, 16%), and least among the “industrialized migrants” from elsewhere (about 3% each for Xhosa, Basotho and Zulu). Presumably the latter had simply learned better how to avoid the white man’s justice.
 Scott Bidstrup

UGOM